A chat with the neighbour

Another lovely day here!

Early in the morning i bumped into the neighbour and asked him what could be eating my plants. He said he’s had more slugs this year than he can ever remember (he’s been living here over 30 years) – he took me into his garden and showed me all the slug pellets he’s been slinging around and how the little bastards are still eating his stuff. So it seems i identified likeliest culprit for the pea disaster then..

Further, we agreed that the weather has been really odd this year, bouncing up and down by ten degrees. The growing season should be in full swing (it’s june!!) but things are only starting to get going.

He said that his ground is so boggy now that he is forced to build raised beds, he’s doing it on a really largescale (he runs a landscaping business and his garden is impressive), even still i felt vindicated for building my little raised beds.

We then moved on to discussing how climate change has irrevocably screwed things up and how there are too many people on the planet. What a great morning discussion!

In the midst of the doom and gloom I declined to tell him about the japanese knotweed infestation hehe.

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Tragedy strikes

Something is munching the peas, squash, courgettes and beans!! This is really terrible, it seems to be a rodent rather than a bird since it’s happening in the various little greenhouses as well as in the open.

Annoyingly, the pest doesn’t even eat the shoot but just neatly snips it off about 4cm off the ground…. very frustrating, especially since last year the best crops were courgette and peas.

I’ve tried various outlandish solutions but this adversary works fast and whoever it is, they’re winning….

Japanese Knotweed

Unfortunately in the last week I’ve been coming across some small shoots of japanese knotweed in the garden, both inside and next to the greenhouse. This is a really really terrible weed, this sensationalist article explains why.

It’s bizarre that it suddenly appears now, i didn’t see any last year at all. It’s practically impossible to get rid of, so we’ll see what happens, all i can do for now is rip it out and burn it when i see it. It’s quite easy to spot, the leaves have dark patches and the stem has red dots.

japanese-knotweed-identification-1024x631

Not sure if in digging the foundation for the greenhouse we somehow unearthed some roots which could then start growing or if it came in with bought bags of earth.

In any case, we now have knotweed on the island 😦